Our Youth & COVID-19 Today

These horrific conditions are the result of decades of ruling class policy, which have left the US, the center of world capitalism, completely unprepared for a significant health care emergency.

For youth, the event will undoubtedly be one of the defining events of their lives, imprinting forever in their minds the realities of life under capitalism in the world’s richest country.

Youth should be a time filled with hope, optimism and idealism. Yet the reality of life today for many, both before and after the onset of the pandemic, has turned youth into a period of struggle and, for some, of despair.

Consider a few of the following facts regarding the conditions facing American workers and youth:

  • The majority of people under the age of 30 have less than $1,000 in their savings accounts. Nearly half have nothing saved at all.
  • The share of the “millennial” generation (those between the ages of 25 and 31) with $0 in savings rose from 31 percent in 2016 to 46 percent in 2017.
  • One in five millennials is living in poverty.
  • Between 1978 and 2017, according to the Economic Policy Institute, CEO compensation rose in the US by 1,070 percent, while the typical worker’s compensation over these 39 years rose by a mere 11.2 percent.
  • According to the CDC, six in 10 adults in the United States have a chronic illness, four in 10 have two or more.

Youth should be a time filled with hope, optimism and idealism. Yet the reality of life today for many, both before and after the onset of the pandemic, has turned youth into a period of struggle and, for some, of despair.

Studies show that young people today suffer from more mental health challenges than all previous generations. In fact, a recent report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that the suicide rate among Americans aged 10 to 24 increased by 56 percent between 2007 and 2017.

The conditions that produce harrowing social ills such as mental illness, drug abuse and even suicide are ultimately the product of decades of policies implemented by the Democrats and Republicans. The response of the ruling class to the pandemic has revealed most sharply that their interests are incompatible with human progress and the very survival of mankind.

The Centers for Disease Control recently released an article on managing and reducing stress. The following is a shortened version, but all of this information can be found on the CDC’s website.

Reduce stress in yourself and others

Sharing the facts about COVID-19 and understanding the actual risk to yourself and people you care about can make an outbreak less stressful.

When you share accurate information about COVID-19 you can help make people feel less stressed and allow you to connect with them.

For Parents

Children and teens react, in part, on what they see from the adults around them. When parents and caregivers deal with the COVID-19 calmly and confidently, they can provide the best support for their children. Parents can be more reassuring to others around them, especially children, if they are better prepared.

Not all children and teens respond to stress in the same way. Some common changes to watch for include

  • Excessive crying or irritation in younger children
  • Returning to behaviors they have outgrown (for example, toileting accidents or bedwetting)
  • Excessive worry or sadness
  • Unhealthy eating or sleeping habits
  • Irritability and “acting out” behaviors in teens
  • Poor school performance or avoiding school
  • Difficulty with attention and concentration
  • Avoidance of activities enjoyed in the past
  • Unexplained headaches or body pain
  • Use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

There are many things you can do to support your child

  • Take time to talk with your child or teen about the COVID-19 outbreak. Answer questions and share facts about COVID-19 in a way that your child or teen can understand.
  • Reassure your child or teen that they are safe. Let them know it is ok if they feel upset. Share with them how you deal with your own stress so that they can learn how to cope from you.
  • Limit your family’s exposure to news coverage of the event, including social media. Children may misinterpret what they hear and can be frightened about something they do not understand.
  • Try to keep up with regular routines. If schools are closed, create a schedule for learning activities and relaxing or fun activities.
  • Be a role model.  Take breaks, get plenty of sleep, exercise, and eat well. Connect with your friends and family members.

cited CDC

Published by Oklahoma Kid

Marty Tipton also known as the Oklahoma Kid is a Trick Roper and Comedian & Humorist. He a fourth generation lasso spinning artist with relative ties to the legendary Will Rogers by way of his grandmother McSpadden who was a cousin to Willy or the legendary Will Rogers. Tipton is a modern-day humorist with a western twist who sends audiances rolling in the isles across america with laughter and amazement.

One thought on “Our Youth & COVID-19 Today

  1. Thanks for sharing this article Marty. Our country is failing to live up to its promises and both political parties are to blame due to greed and corruption. Now we have to find creative, innovative ways to change and move forward with solutions as our children are our future. Love you ♥️

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    Like

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